Category Archives: 2005

February 20, 2015

Michael Younger

Younger
Major and Classification
Public Policy, Management and Planning
Faculty Mentor

LaVonna Lewis, Ph.D.

Department

Policy, Planning, and Development

McNair Project
“Investigating the Phenomenon: The Increasing College Enrollment of Low-Income African American Students but the Failure to Obtain College Degrees”
Numerous reports have stated that each year increasing numbers of low-income African American students graduate from high school academically prepared to enter college, but unfortunately experience financial barriers that limit their ability to

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February 20, 2015

Leticia Williams

Williams
Major and Classification
Broadcast Journalism
Faculty Mentor

Sarah Banet Weiser, Ph.D.

Department

Communication

McNair Project
“From Black and White to Color: Racial Representation in Children’s Animated Television”
This study analyzes racial representation in children’s animated programs on cable television. It is based on content analysis of the cast of programs on Disney and Nickelodeon that target children. Data was gathered from the network’s websites, and other credible online sources, including TV Tome. The goal of the study was to evaluate

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February 20, 2015

Kimberly White

Major and Classification
Psychology
Faculty Mentor

Brian Lickel, Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

McNair Project
“Colorism: How Skin Tone Affects African American Women”
The focus of this study is on how colorism may affect self-image. Colorism is a bias or preference for light skin. This study used interviews and surveys to explore the how skin tone and colorism affects the self-image of young African-American women, ages 18-24. Knowledge of the role skin tone plays among African American women increases our understanding of colorism and also improves our ability to build

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February 20, 2015

Theresa Rodriguez

Rodriguez
Major and Classification
American Studies and Ethnicity
Faculty Mentor

Terry Seip, Ph.D.

Department

History

McNair Project
“Leisure and Slavery: Surviving Life as an African American Slave in Mississipp”
While African American slaves endured a miserable existence at the bottom of antebellum society, constantly suffering exploitation, punishment, humiliation, and substandard material conditions, they still had some leisure time. By discovering and critically examining slaves’ leisure activities and the time

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February 20, 2015

Guadalupe Ramirez

Ramirez
Major and Classification
Political Science
Faculty Mentor

Frederick Moten, Ph.D.

Department

History

McNair Project
“The Postwar Subject: I-dentity Development of Indigenous Peoples in Guatemala”
Environment and situation are essential to the development of identity, but what is the role of the individual? Under the Garcia and Montt presidencies (1978-1983) in the mountainous Northern Region of El Quiche, Guatemala, the indigenous people were massacred in a campaign of mass extermination. The Mayan ethnocide plunged the Quiche people into “crisis”, impacting both

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February 20, 2015

Crystal Perl

PErl
Major and Classification
Religion
Faculty Mentor

David Sloane, Ph.D.

Department

Policy, Planning, and Development

McNair Project
“Interviewing Stones: A Field Survey of Gravestone Styles, Los Angeles County 1850-1900”
Until now, analysis of 19th century gravestone trends in Los Angeles was impossible. Studies on the material culture of death, including gravestones, cemeteries, and cadavers, in the United States were almost exclusively limited to the Northeast (Laderman, Sloane). Consequentially, primary data for

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February 20, 2015

Heidy Medina

Medina
Major and Classification
International Relations
Faculty Mentors

Professor Dean Campbell

Department

Political Science

McNair Project
“Turning Culture into an Incubator for Success: Understanding the Dynamics of Ethnic Enclaves in Microfinance Replication”
This paper examines the relationship between entrenched cultural values that support social networks and how these aspects of culture can promote the sustainability of microfinance programs in urban communities in the United States. By analyzing the social factors that have contributed

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February 20, 2015

Joella’ Ann McKenzie

Major and Classification
International Relations
Faculty Mentor

Todd Sandler, Ph.D.

Department

International Relations

McNair Project
“Increasing Cooperation in Counterterrorism Using Game Theoretic Analysis”
Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the international community has spent tens of billions of dollars on the formation and implementation of counterterrorism policies. However, economic analysis has concluded that cooperation within the international community is an integral part of the success of counterterrorist efforts. This collective action has been difficult to achieve. Policies requiring coordination are particularly difficult to achieve when many

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February 20, 2015

Wendy Mata

Mata
Major and Classification
Astronomy
Faculty Mentor

Edward Rhodes, Ph.D.

Department

Physics

McNair Project
Temporal Dependence of the Solar P-Mode Oscillation Frequencies to Changes in Solar Activity
Previous studies using the so-called “ring diagram” method of local helioseismology have shown that the sensitivity of the solar p-mode oscillation frequencies to changes in solar activity may change as a function of time as the solar cycle progresses from one minimum

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February 20, 2015

Cecilia Martinez-Gil

CeciliaMartinezGil-Book-Part1
Major and Classification
Comparative Literature
Faculty Mentor

Moshe Lazar, Ph.D.

Department

Comparative Literature

McNair Project
“Two Writers from One Americas: Mirroring the Works of William Faulkner and Juan Carlos Onetti”
This exploration tackled a comparative study in the area of culture studies on two short stories, “A Rose for Emily” and “The Purloined Bride,” written by William Faulkner and Juan Carlos Onetti, respectively. Because of the writers’s’ styles of Fantastic Fiction and

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