Category Archives: 2003

February 20, 2015

Deborah Jarret

Major and Classification
Biochemistry
Faculty Mentors

Professor Mimi C. Yu

Department

Preventive Medicine

McNair Project
“Tea Polyphenols and Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genotype in relation to Breast Cancer risk”
Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women. Both environmental and genetic factors have been linked to breast cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to further analyze the gene-environment interaction, specifically that between Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene and tea consumption, in relation to breast cancer risk among Chinese women in the Singapore-Chinese Health Study. COMT exists as a polymorphism: those

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February 20, 2015

Robert Green

Major and Classification
Art History
Faculty Mentors

Professor Todd Olson

Department

Art History

McNair Project
The Irascibly Resilient Mr. Punch
This research broadly examines the evolution of heroic national symbols of America and Great Britain by exploring imagery of Uncle Sam; The Statue of Liberty; Britannia; The British Lion; and, most specifically, Mr. Punch who began as a circus oddity. Eventually, the artists and editors of Punch Magazine: The London Charivari (1841-1996), transformed Punch into a mouth-piece for the masses of Great Britain at the height of the

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February 20, 2015

Leticia Franco

Major and Classification
Business Administration
Faculty Mentors

Professor Roberto Lint Sagarena

Department

Sociology

McNair Project
“Oaxacan Immigrant Entrepreneurs in Los Angeles: An Ethnographic Study of Zapotec Restaurant Owners”
This study compares Oaxacan immigrant entrepreneurs in Los Angeles to other immigrant ethnic minority entrepreneurs in an effort to explain the factors/experiences that have led these individuals to become self-employed entrepreneurs. Although these immigrant groups faced similar challenges in the U.S., Oaxacan restaurant owners are impacted/influenced by different factors and circumstances that provide an understanding of how they successfully start

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February 20, 2015

Nathaniel Dumas

Major and Classification
Cinema
Faculty Mentors

Professor Lanita Jacobs – Huey

Department

Anthropology

McNair Project
“CONTESTING PORKY AND WANDA CRITIQUING MAINSTREAM MEDIA IN THE STUTTERING COMMUNITY”
This paper examines how members of stutterers support groups critically engage mainstream representations of their speech in popular culture (e.g., movies, news reports, etc.). Drawing from ethnographic observations of two Southern California stuttering support groups and interviews with members over the past year, I explore how participants manage public and private discourse around their individual and collective identity and strategies of resistance

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February 20, 2015

Janis Dossen

Major and Classification
Biochemistry
Faculty Mentors

Professor Valter Longo

Department

Molecular Gerontology

McNair Project
“Longevity in S. Cerevisiae”
Recently published studies on model systems such as yeast, worms, and fruit flies suggest that longevity in many eukaryotes may be regulated by fundamental mechanisms specific to stress resistance and growth. The replicative life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) is one paradigm that has allowed for the recognition of long-lived mutant strains; another is the chronological life span. This paper discusses the relevance of studying longevity in yeast in terms

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February 20, 2015

Marissa Corona

Major and Classification
Psychology
Faculty Mentors

Professor Shannon Daley

Department

Psychology

McNair Project
“Quality of Friendships Among Ethnic Minority Adolescents and the Effects on Psychological Adjustment”
This study examines the quality of close friendships among ethnic minority adolescents to determine any differences between genders and between ethnicities. One-hundred seventy 10th grade students from Manual Arts High School in South Los Angeles participated in this study. Two Qualities of friendship were measured: Intimacy and Conflict. Significant differences were found for Intimate Exchange, with girls showing higher rates of intimacy

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February 20, 2015

Karina Cabral

Major and Classification
Mathematics
Faculty Mentors

Professor Linda S. Hagedorn

Department

Education

McNair Project
“Academic Performance of At Risk Latino Students: Assessing the Role of Family in the Academic Performance of First and Second Generation Latino/a Students at Manual Arts High School, Los Angeles”
Latino students are now the largest ethnic minority group in California’s public schools, accounting for nearly 42% of the total population. While the number of Latino students in public schools is expected to increase in the foreseeable future, their academic performance is not. Latino

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February 20, 2015

Danielle Arzaga

Major and Classification
Public Policy and Management
Faculty Mentors

Professor Phoebe Liebig & Professor Donna Benton

Department

Gerontology

McNair Project
“Acculturation and Decision Making of Latino Caregivers in Los Angeles County”
Research on Latinos in gerontology needs to move away from familism, informal social support, care giver burden and experience and issues of socioeconomic conditions towards exploring the impact/influence acculturation has on Latino care giving. Using acculturation theory as a guideline, researchers can better understand the caregiver and decisions they make in regards to the assistance and care

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February 20, 2015

Eduardo Arenas

Major and Classification
Urban Planning and Development
Faculty Mentors

Professor Martin Krieger

Department

Planning and Development

McNair Project
“The Gentrification of Boyle Heights”
This research paper seeks to understand how the local state uses the redevelopment process to gentrify low-income Latino neighborhoods in Los Angeles. Gentrification is commonly known to displace low-income residents, and replace them with higher-income residents by increasing the cost of housing. Redevelopment can also accomplish this. It is argued here that the eventual displacement of low-income residents is already visible in who the local

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February 20, 2015

Anthony Agbasi

Major and Classification
Business Administration
Faculty Mentors

Professor Rakesh Niraj

Department

Business, Marketing

McNair Project
“Marketing Social Stereotypes: How Marketing Practices Shape The Career Choices of African American Adolescents from Low-Income Families”
The proposed research seeks to address the issue of low minority representation in highly selective careers in academic and business institutions by examining the marketing practices of various media directed at young African American males from low-income families. The main objective of the project is to explore whether the social stereotypes used and promoted by these

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