Category Archives: 2003

February 20, 2015

Brittany Webb

Major and Classification
Political Science, International Relations
Faculty Mentors

Professor Steven Lamy

Department

International Relations

McNair Project
“Democratic Stability Theory in Africa”
The Bush Doctrine characterizes underdeveloped third-world nations as weak states, capable of posing a threat to U.S. national interests. In an effort to alleviate some of the elements that contribute to these nations’ vulnerability, the U.S. government has expressed a commitment to aiding in the stabilization of these nations through democratization. Theories of democratic stability have hypothesized necessary components of stable democracy, but most of them

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February 20, 2015

Alice Villatoro

Major and Classification
Psychology
Faculty Mentors

Professor Larua Baker

Department

Psychology

McNair Project
“Discrepancy in Agreement: Step to Understanding Informant Reliability”
The purpose of the project is to understand how rater characteristics influence agreement between caregiver-child pairs when evaluating childhood aggression on the Child Aggression Questionnaire (CAQ) in an on going twin study. The Southern California Twin Project uses a multi-informant approach in assessments of aggression. The participating pre-adolescent twins are 9-10 years old. Factors like depression, anxiety, SES, age and gender are reviewed in this project, in

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February 20, 2015

John Russell

Major and Classification
Broadcast Journalism, Political Science
Faculty Mentors

Professor Mary Dudziak

Department

Law School

McNair Project
“Examining the trade agreement between U.S. and sub-Sahara Africa”
At the birth of the new millennium, the U.S. and sub-Sahara Africa opted to develop ties with each other after centuries of estrangement. In 2000, both parties entered into a trade agreement, which is lauding approval as the most generous trade arrangement given by the U.S. to any trading partner. However, this paper will examine this bill closer and prove that this

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February 20, 2015

Patrick Popa

Major and Classification
Biology, Psychology
Faculty Mentors

Professor Albert A. Herrera

Department

Biological Sciences, Neurobiology

McNair Project
“An Assessment of Synapse Elimination in Xenopus laevis”
Using various stages of Xenopus laevis frog tadpoles as reference specimens, this research seeks to answer how synapse elimination occurs (i.e. the underlying mechanisms behind mononeuronal innervation) and the possible role of synapse activity (synaptic efficacy) in this process during embryonic development. Data will be collected using cholinesterase stained pectoral muscle fibers from stage 56-66 tadpoles. In adults, the number of neuromuscular junctions

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February 20, 2015

Alexis Pankey

Major and Classification
African American Studies
Faculty Mentors

Professor Janelle Wong

Department

Political Science

McNair Project
“Political Socialization: What does the African American experience reveal about how immigrants are being incorporated?”
Today, one of every five Americans, over fifty-five million people, are immigrants or the children of immigrants. (Portes and Rumbaut 2001) With immigrants representing an increasing proportion of the U.S. population, it is of increasing import to consider how immigrants are being socialized into the American political system, and how those methods of socialization relate to their

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February 20, 2015

Michelle Ovalle

Major and Classification
Psychology
Faculty Mentors

Professor Lynn Miller

Department

Psychology, Communication

McNair Project
“Short-term relationships: Are partner preferences self-regulating emotional (and sexual) outcomes?”
Despite extensive research on the sexual mating strategies of men and women in short-term relationships, it is still unclear what men and women are seeking in a short-term partner, and why these specified preferences exist. Previous research suggests that sexual enjoyment is important in all relationships which involve sexual activity, but may be more exclusively important in short-term relationships. The biology and chemistry of

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February 20, 2015

Amy Osorio

Major and Classification
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention
Faculty Mentors

Professor Kate Wilber

Department

Gerontology

McNair Project
“Executive Dysfunction in the Elderly and Financial Abuse”
This research project proposes to address the problem of financial abuse in the elderly by examining the role of cognitive impairment. Cognitive competence or the ability to perform simple tasks in everyday life makes an individual capable of living independently. This research explores the relationship between the executive dysfunction or cognitive impairment in elders and piloting an instrument to assess cognitive impairment in

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February 20, 2015

Elizabeth Ontaneda

Major and Classification
International Relations, Economics
Faculty Mentors

Professor Carol Wise & Professor Clara Irazabal

Department

International Relations

McNair Project
“Spatializing governance: the construction of an alternative geography of citizenship in Villa El Salvador, Lima, Peru”
The urban “slum” settlement, or barriada, of Villa El Salvador in Lima, Peru is a relevant working case study for Lima’s geographically and socially marginal areas since the settlement’s founding in 1971 as a showcase for the Velasco military regime’s urban settlements program. This status as showcase settlement provided Villa El Salvador

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February 20, 2015

Ana Morales

Major and Classification
American Studies
Faculty Mentors

Professor Maria Elena Martinez-Lopez

Department

History

McNair Project
“The Role of Zapatista Feminism: Gender Roles Between Men and Women in Chiapas, Mexico”
This research paper aims to explain the history and significance of the Zapatista Army for National Liberation (EZLN) and the gender roles women play within the EZLN and the Maya communities of eastern Chiapas. The history of the EZLN can be understood through its geography, its relation with the icon and memory of Emiliano Zapata and the Mexican Revolution,

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February 20, 2015

Beza Merid

Major and Classification
Psychology, Comparative Literature
Faculty Mentors

Professor Gloria Orenstein

Department

Comparative Literature

McNair Project
“Erasing Couvade: Accounting For Change In Interpretive Trends”
The couvade is a practice found globally, involving ritualized behaviors performed by men in tribal societies throughout a woman’s pregnancy and just after she gives birth. Anthropologists have offered a variety of interpretations of this ritual, suggesting it may have fended off malevolent spirits or established social paternity. The two trends that appear most frequently in the literature, however, are those of couvade as

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